Drink Tube – Promotional Product

The Brief

  • Create a new, original Promotional Product
  • A brand new bespoke product
  • Merging existing ideas to create a new & unique product
  • Must be innovative
  • Must be able to be branded
  • Consider Manufacturability and materials
  • Consider the product’s use and consumer relevance
  • Reasonable Lifespan
  • Sustainability

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Our Interpretation

A promotional drinks tube that fits in your pocket. The Drink Tube is cleaned, filled and sold at festival bars. It enables visitors to take their drink into the crowd without spilling.

It is meant to be reused over the period of the festival. Water, beer or soft drinks can be purchased at a discount and filled in it.

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Problem: Staying Hydrated in Crowds

For this product, we imagined something with a real use, a great advertising value and economic manufacturing methods. Targeted at visitors of large, sponsored events, or for marketing campaigns for giving away freebies.

We focused on common materials and processes during our ideation process. The success of a Promotional Products relies on affordable ingredients.
The problem we set out so solve was staying hydrated in crowds, especially during big summer events. Combining a water container with an advertising medium, we imagined a range of scenarios:

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For this product, we imagined something with a real use,
a great advertising value and economic manufacturing methods. Targeted at visitors of large, sponsored events, or for marketing campaigns for giving away freebies.
We focused on common materials and processes during our ideation process. The success of a Promotional Products relies on affordable ingredients.
The problem we set out so solve was staying hydrated in crowds, especially during big summer events. Combining a water container with an advertising medium, we imagined a range of scenarios:

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Market Analysis

To guarantee the success of the product, we aimed it to be usable by the majority of people. We imagined our concept to be distributed at political campaigns, marketing strategies, festivals or concerts.
Similar to branded flasks, companies could use their logos to sponsor our bottles at marathons, festivals, political campaigns, or part of a newspaper subscription.
Our solution would perform its task well, fit well ergonomically and apply universally over a variety of users.

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Materials: PET and PP

PET is a thermoplastic semi-crystalline resin. It can vary in rigidity, thickness and colour. It is mostly used for synthetic fibres and bottles. Recovered PET is sold on to manufacturers and remelted into shapes for new applications. This makes our product 100% recyclable.
PP is most commonly injection-moulded into caps, cups, and suchlike. It is mainly used in the manufacturing of food packaging, lab equipment, bottle and tube closures, and in the automotive industry. PP also has a high heat resistance.

Stretch Blow Moulding

Stretch Blow Moulding appeared to be the ideal solution. it is the most common process in PET carbonated drinks bottles. It is done by preparing a form into which the thermoplastic is injected. then hot air is blown from the core which expands the form against a cold mould cavity. then, the closure would be injection moulded from PP and receive a silkscreen print.

Injection Moulding

Injection moulded closures are produced primarily from polypropylene, polyethylene and styrene. These closures offer flexibility in structure and design and are economical. We can even create a unique closure design and it would still perform well and people would understand its function. The larger design offers a larger advertising space.

Shrink Sleeve Labelling

Instead of printing directly on the product, we will use a shrink sleeve, similar to the plastic label around a Coke bottle. We should avoid paper and adhesives.
These sleeves slipped onto the product and then heat shrunk to be tightly enclosing about 90% of the body. The thickness of this sleeve should not exceed 50 micron for good recyclability and separation.

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Conclusion

Working with real manufacturers and relying on the expertise for the estimation of 100.000 units of a design taught us the professional world of design. The organisation that goes into a product behind the scenes, something the customer never sees, is an exciting process. If DFM is not considered with immaculate thoroughness, a product won’t work.

We learnt in this exercise the difference between a great idea and a real product. Practical thinking, more than anything, was developed throughout the activity. Now the ways of communicating with manufacturers, the common processes of our things and how to take a design from start to finish are clearer. We went from not knowing anything to knowing how little we know.